Sweeten the Jameson pill

Jame G & L1Jame G&L

  • Jameson 40% alcohol/ethanol is unpalatable,  Jameson advise adding sweeteners  to make it palatable
  • The target consumer, young inexperienced drinkers, to get them hooked up early
  • This mixture calls for ginger ale and slices of lime
  • The bottle on display has been deliberately blurred and sanitized to ensure any reference to alcohol is obliterated
  • Sine Metu – Without Fear. The Jameson family motto, is featured prominently, why is that?
  • The bottle of Jameson whiskey is displayed, to encourage the target consumer to buy by the bottle
  • The mandatory “enjoy Jameson sensibly” tagline is barely visible in the top corner
  • What does this mean? Can a person enjoy 40% alcohol/ethanol sensibly?
  • Drinkaware.ie. Will this tell the consumer how much a person can drink before they become insensible?
  • Alcohol/ethanol is a toxic, addictive, psychoactive drug, a threat to every part of the body. The consumer has the right to be informed about all aspects of alcohol/ethanol in the advertisement
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Drink is such a waste

Alcohol is a powerful, addictive drug with the capacity to transform a personality in an instant. The saying “First a person takes a drink, then the drink takes a drink, then the drink takes the person” is so true

Drink is a waste of health.  Alcohol/ethanol and its associate acetaldehyde is very damaging to all vital elements of the body and mind

Drink is a waste of time.  Drinking over time ends up with the person in a state of dependence, spending more and more time drinking and intoxicated. The mind and body are depressed for long periods

Drink is a waste of money.  Hundreds of euros or pounds in a week, thousands in a year, hundreds of thousands over many years

Drink is  a waste of life.  Alcohol is a toxic drug that kills cells, the very building blocks of life

The Effects of alcohol on the Body

Even a small amount of alcohol has an effect on your body. When you drink, alcohol is absorbed into your bloodstream and distributed throughout your body. A tiny amount of alcohol exits your body in your urine and your breath.

You absorb alcohol more slowly if you eat, especially if the food is high in fat. However, if you drink more than your body can process, you’ll get drunk. How quickly alcohol is metabolized depends on your size and gender, among other things.

Alcohol consumption causes physical and emotional changes that can do great harm to your body. The long-term effects of alcohol abuse are many, putting your health in serious jeopardy and endangering your life.

The liver takes the brunt
Alcohol must pass through the liver. Chronic alcohol abuse overwhelms the liver so it can’t break down harmful substances
Slurred speech
Slurred speech is one of the first signs you’ve had too much
Shrinking frontal lobe
Impaired judgement may be the result of a shrinking brain
Strange sensations
Numbness  and pain in your hands and feet may be the result of damage to your nervous system
Hallucinations
When chronic drinkers suddenly stop drinking, severe withdrawal symptoms, including hallucinations may occur
Major mouth problems
 A loose tooth, together with other signs of alcohol addiction, could be a sign your drinking is out of control
Malnutrition
Alcohol interferes with your body’s ability to use the nutrients and vitamins in the food you eat
Hard on the heart
Heavy drinking can mess with your heart rhythm or even damage your heart muscle
Sexual dysfunction
Drinking is no aphrodisiac, in fact it can make you sexually dysfunctional
Birth defects 
Drinking during pregnancy can cause a lifetime of problems for your newborn
Muscle cramps
A muscle cramp can be a signal you’re drinking too much
Check out that cough
People who drink a lot are more susceptible to lung infections like tuberculosis
Pain in the pancreas
Pancreatitis is a life threatening condition. One of the causes of chronic pancreatitis is alcoholism
Diabetic danger zone
If you have diabetes, excessive alcohol consumption can lead to many complications
Coordination
That uncoordinated attempt to walk a straight line might mean you’ve had more to drink than your body can process
Blackouts
Can’t remember what you did last night? Or are parts of the night missing from your memory. It may be a sign you drank too much
Shifty eyes
Long-term alcohol abuse can cause involuntary eye movements
Dependence
If you become physically dependent, a doctor’s care may make withdrawal safer
Stomach distress
Bloating, gas or painful stomach ulcers could be the result of too much alcohol
Gotta go
 A damaged digestive tract may not work efficiently, leading to bouts of diarrhoea
Fighting fatigue
Fatigue could be a sign of anemia, a possible sign of alcoholism
Infertility
in the long-term, excessive alcohol can make it difficult to conceive
Skinny skeleton
Thinning bones may lead to easy fractures

Is red wine good for your heart?

No, is the simple answer

The French paradox – in spite of high saturated fat intake, the French die less of coronary heart disease thanks to their higher consumption of red wine

The concept that drinking red wine can prevent cardiovascular disease dates back to the early nineties, when Serge Renaud and Michel de Lorgeril published a paper in the Lancet entitled,   ” Wine, alcohol, platelets and the French paradox for coronary heart disease”. They argued that whereas their consumption of saturated fat was high, mortality from coronary heart disease was low compared to the US and the UK. They called this the “French paradox” The difference was the French drink more red wine, there was some protective polyphenols that came straight from red grapes. The studies were based on data from three French cities, Toulouse, Strasbourg and Lille. CHD mortality was much lower in Toulouse compared to Strasbourg and Lille, however wine consumption was much higher in Toulouse compared to the other two cities.

In the 1990s, wine  sales in europe were declining, with many young people switching to beer, wine drinking was seen to be old-fashioned. The wine industry jumped on the “French paradox” story promoting an epic marketing campaign which instilled in a lot of people the idea that drinking red wine is good for your heart.

A great deal of research ensued and found, while there was some beneficial effects from the extracts from grapes, the amount of wine needed to get enough resveratrols to produce a significant effect would be incompatible with the toxic effects of alcohol.

The key to below the norm mortality rates from CHD in Toulouse, was not red wine but diet. While they drank more red wine and ate slightly more cheese, they ate a lot more vegetables, a lot more fruit, half the butter and more vegetable fat and more bread. In other words they were eating more fruit and vegetables and ingested more fibre, less saturated fat, more polyunsaturated fat and more grains.

The popular narrative of the French paradox gets the premise and the conclusion wrong. It is wrong to assume that saturated fat is all that matters to predict cardiovascular risk, since we know it is just one of the many dietary factors involved. And it is dead wrong to suggest that drinking a few glasses of red wine is all you need to make it better. If anything, the whole story proves once more the concept that the balance of diet in general is more important than any single component in preventing disease and ensuring good health.

http://www.nutrition.org. 01/18/2013; Stefano Vendrame

Our brain is inconceivable, beyond imagination

brain-regions-100414-02

The brain is made up of an inconceivable number of cells

An “enchanted loom” is how Charles Sherrington described the interconnected net of cells that make up our three-pound control centre. Indeed there is something almost magical in the notion that all our mental processes from perception, to memory to consciousness itself, can be described entirely by cellular activity in the brain.

The basic functional unit of the brain is the neuron, a special cell that sends electrochemical signals to other neurons (across a “synaptic gap”) and thereby creates those patterns that make up what we think of as the mind.

The complexity of the task requires a fairly inconceivable 100 billion neurons, interconnected via trillions of synapses. A single firing neutron might communicate to thousands of others in a single moment. No computer comes close to the complexity of these communicating bits of organic matter.

What’s more, for each neuron there are 10 to 15 glial cells providing structural support, protection, resources and more.

Source; http://www.livescience.com

Alcohol is a drug that goes to the brain, interfering with the cells, disrupting the communication. That is why after a few drinks we have difficulty thinking, talking, walking, eating. The more alcohol, the more out of control.

Why do we consciously interfere with the workings of this incredible machine?

If we knew how much damage we were doing to our brain, would we drink as much?

Would we drink at all?

Keith Floyd on pleasure

I drink whisky, I drink beer, I drink wine. I love fatty pork and beef on the bone. I eat chocolate, fish and chips and caviar and drink vodka. I drink instant coffee but adore a Spanish cafe solo. I eat chillies, ginger and garlic. I adore pungent blue cheeses like Roquefort and Gorgonzola and Danish Blue. I love liver with fried onions and I enjoy ice cream and hot chocolate sauce between cigarettes. I drink Champagne on occasion, aquavit rarely, gin and tonic occasionally. I love apples and Mars bars. In fact I am a chocaholic. Actually I am a kind of gastronomic tramp. I am too hungry for dinner at eight, and sometimes at breakfast a curry is great. Ossobuco in an Italian service station can please, an ignorantly served hamburger can bring you to your knees. For me the whole thing about eating and drinking is whatever gives you pleasure, enjoyment and fun

Sadly Keith Floyd died of a heart attack at 66. From the book Floyd Uncorked by Jonathan Pedley with Keith Floyd

 

The land of potatoes and Guinness…and more Guinness

This stage Irish characterisation is taken from;  http://www.uncoverdiscover.com

The context; Top 10 beer drinking countries – Ireland is ranked 4th in the world. It continues;

So the stereotype of Paddy’s enjoying their Guinness does have some grounding then. With a per capita consumption of 104 litres, Ireland is firmly in 4th place in the list of top beer drinking countries in the world. Guinness sales top 1.5billion pints worldwide and we wonder how many are consumed by the natives themselves

We should thank Guinness for this then? No way. We grew up in a country where Guinness  is good for you. Your national pride was measured by how many pints you could drink. A mindset arrogantly nurtured by Guinness over generations.

You would think the natives would cop on by now? Not if Guinness have their way. Guinness alcohol is inseparably linked with sport, music, and anything close to the heart of the young Irish man. They continue to pour money into sponsorship

There is a change. Growing concern for one’s health. Alcohol is a serious threat

 

 

Do you know how alcohol affects your skin? 10 Q&A’s

1. Why does your skin appear dull after drinking?

Alcohol dehydrates your skin and depletes it of vital skin nutrients

2. If you overindulge in alcohol, what long-term effect on facial blood vessels occur?

Drinking alcohol causes facial blood vessels to dilate. Excessive alcohol can cause the vessels to dilate permanently. This causes red spiky veins.

3. Does alcohol consumption affect other skin conditions such as rosacea and psoriasis?

Alcohol may aggravate these skin conditions and cause additional flare ups

4. Which foods should you avoid when suffering a hangover?

Anything fried. Choose nutrient rich foods to reverse some of the negative effects of the drinking from the night before, whole grain toast for example

5. Alcohol depletes which beneficial vitamin?

Vitamin A, an important anti-oxidant

6. Why is vitamin A beneficial to the skin?

Vitamin A is an anti-oxidant that boosts collagen production and skin cell turnover

7. What is the primary physical trait of heavy drinkers?

Heavy drinkers usually have rosy cheeks, a red nose or a flushed face

8. What should you drink along with alcohol to avoid dehydration?

Drinking water along with alcohol will counteract the effects of the alcohol and will decrease dehydration

9. The toxins in alcohol can contribute to what unattractive skin flaw?

Alcohol can cause the build up of cellulite

10. After several drinks, the body will divert oxygen and blood away from where?

The skin. Skin loses important blood circulation because oxygen and blood is diverted to the liver and other organs

Source: Howstuffworks.com

 

Alcohol and calories (in women); does drinking cause weight gain?

“When you drink alcohol, its broken down into acetaldehyde (basically vinegar) , which the body will burn before any other calorie you’ve consumed or stored including fat or even sugar. So if you drink and consume more calories than you need , you’re more likely to store the fat from the Cheez Whiz you ate and the sugar from the  Coke you drank because your body is getting all its energy from the acetaldehyde in the beer you sucked down.

Further, studies show that alcohol temporarily inhibits “lipid oxidisation” – in other words, when alcohol is in your system, it’s harder for your body to burn fat that’s already there. Since eating fat is the most metabolically efficient way to put fat on your body – you actually use a small amount of calories when you turn excess carbs and protein into body fat, but excess fat slips right into your saddlebags, no costume change necessary – hypothetically speaking, following a high fat – high alcohol diet would be the easiest way to put on weight”

Rachael Coombe, Elle.com

Alcohol and drug addiction – Deficiency in the brain

Research has found that there are electro-physiological deficits in the brains of alcoholics

Not just in alcoholics but in their progeny, suggesting that electro-physiological deficits exist even before alcohol consumption in the children of people who drink alcohol

Drug taking changes the brains magnetic and electrical systems impacting on the body’s nervous system to produce a high

With long-term use they act to devitalise the body, having a seriously damaging effect on the vital life force, further reinforcing the need to take the drug

Low magnetic levels in the brain and body are caused by deficiencies of folic acid, zinc, thiamine and other nutrients

The western based meat diet is largely responsible. It is nutritionally inadequate in terms of antidioxant vitamins and minerals, and deficient in negative magnetism

Over time, the animal product diet can create abnormal cravings for drugs which will differ in strength depending on nutrient availability and level of magnetic balance

On such a diet the natural opioids no longer function as they should, causing craving and eventually drug use and addiction. Drugs supply exhilaration as they stimulate the reward or pleasure centre of the brain. They act to increase the electrical firing in the reward centre releasing certain neurotransmitters which induce a sense of euphoria, elevation in mood, increased arousal and motivation

Excited by the drug taking behaviour, the brain’s neural circuitry adapts to the chemical state. If the drug is withdrawn, brain function is impaired and pleasure is replaced by pain, inducing depression and a loss of energy and motivation. Continued drug use is reinforced, first by the physical addiction and secondly,  by the strong psychological desire to avoid painful withdrawal

Drug taking behaviour and abuse is a form of appetitive behaviour as drugs stimulate the same area of the brain that rules feeding and drinking i.e., the reward and pleasure centre. A poor nutritional and vital state will create the need to consume or use drugs. The link between nutrition, appetite and drugs is further enforced by the fact that drugs replace the need for food as a person becomes more dependent

Alcohol functions primarily to relax as does opium. Other drugs stimulate (e.g., caffeine),  and can trigger the tension that may lead to drinking

Some drinkers drink to reduce social tensions or feelings of inadequacy. Some may drink to attain a positive pleasure rather than to combat a negative stimulus. But all these mental and emotional triggers have neurophsyiological and nutritional abnormality as their precursors

The similarity between behaviours of those people who are addicted to food( anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa) and those who are addicted to drugs  indicates a disorder of the self-regulatory control of the appetite. The drug takers habit may be triggered by emotional factors as in the obese, bulimic or anorexic persons’ eating patterns, but these are secondary stimuli.

The primary cause is poor diet and the brain’s consequent magnetic and chemical imbalance

Source; Awaremed.com