Calling all Todd’s, this “It’s Thursday and I’m Thirsty” is for you

Cap Morgan Hot toddy

Aggressive promotion of heavy alcohol on Twitter

Kill the toxic taste of alcohol/ethanol

Hide behind a cartoon character

Deceive the consumer – alcohol has no health benefits whatsoever

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Whats in the barrel Bushmills?

Bushmills cask

Heavy alcohol of course

Bushmills like all alcohol companies..

Regard the mention of alcohol as toxic

Just like the drug they produce!

Fire Eater, a new heavy alcohol drink aimed at youths!

An article in the latest issue of Marketing.ie describes how RED C Research undertook a product test for Brown Forman’s new Fire Eater brand.

The research company ran tastings and focus groups to test the appeal for Early Times Fire Eater, a 35% heavy alcohol/ethanol American whiskey liqueur, flavoured with brown sugar and cinnamon.

According to Red C;

The key market for the new product was the “pre-drinking” or “prinking” among 18-24 year olds. A typical pub product test would not work. To replicate the “prinking” and for respondents to consume the product in as natural environment as possible, we recruited young drinkers to host in-home parties, invite their friends over and sample the drink as they would do on a typical social night.

Initial reaction to the product was captured through video and photos recorded by those at the party. They were uploaded to the Red C portal to give reaction to the product captured in the right environment. The flow of the night was left to the participants to decide, allowing for natural behaviour to develop. All of this allowed for valuable insights into the ritual and behaviour during“prinks”

The Urban Dictionary defines Prinking or Pre-Drinking as;

 The act in which one consumes alcohol prior to attending an event at which alcoholic beverages may or may not be served. Often popular with university or college students who can’t afford to buy too many drinks at a bar.  Or high school kids who plan to attend events such as dances.

Brown Forman, already well armed with Jack Daniels, a big seller in the pubs among the young, are lining up another heavy alcohol product. This time aimed at youths, a younger sector than that for Jack Daniels

A question for Brown Forman; How does the strategy of targeting 18-24 year olds with sweetened heavy alcohol fit in with your Corporate responsibility philosophy regarding alcohol abuse among the young?

Questions for Red C

  1. Was there a limit on how much heavy alcohol the young drinkers could consume at the in-home parties?
  2. Was there anyone younger than 18 at these parties?
  3. Boys and girls, was it an equal split?
  4. The ritual and behaviour during “Prinks”, what sort of behaviour is that?
  5. How ethical is this form of research
  6. Does Red C have a code of Corporate Responsibility for research?

Pregnancy and Alcohol

alcohol and pregnancy
When you consume alcohol during pregnancy, so does your baby because alcohol passes freely through the placenta to your baby. If you choose to drink alcohol while you are pregnant, you will increase the risk that your baby will be born with a Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD).Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD) are the full spectrum of birth defects caused by prenatal alcohol exposure. Up to 40,0000 babies are born with a FASD each year in the U.S.

Facts About Pregnancy and Alcohol:

Alcohol is a teratogen

Teratogen is a substance known to be harmful to human development.

Alcohol crosses the placenta to your baby

When you drink alcohol, so does your baby. Because babies are small compared to adults, alcohol breaks down much more slowly than in a grown person.  This means that alcohol remains in a baby’s blood much longer than in the blood of its mother thus leading to possible irreversible harm to the baby’s development.

All drinks containing alcohol can harm your baby

There is no known safe amount of alcohol that you can consume if you are pregnant. It is best to discuss any drinking patterns with your healthcare provider.

Pregnancy and Alcohol: Effects on the Baby

Your baby is in a constant state of growth and development over the entire course of your pregnancy.

During the first four weeks of pregnancy, your baby’s heart, central nervous system, eyes, arms, and legs are developing. Your baby’s brain begins to develop around the third week and continues to mature through the rest of your pregnancy. During the third trimester, your baby will be growing rapidly. If you consume an excessive amount of alcohol during these crucial stages of development, you can cause serious harm to your baby.

Results of excessive drinking (drinking on a regular basis or binge drinking) can lead to Fetal Alcohol Syndrome or Fetal Alcohol Effects. These are lifetime, irreversible effects that can result in physical, mental and neurobehavioral birth defects.

What if I drank alcohol before I knew I was pregnant?

If you were not aware that you were pregnant and drank alcohol, the best thing you can do now is to STOP drinking immediately. The sooner you quit, the better. If you stop drinking now, the risk of harm will decrease.

Is there any safe amount of alcohol to drink during pregnancy?

There is no known amount of alcohol that is safe to consume while pregnant and the more you drink, the more you will increase the risk that your baby will have problems. According to the Surgeon General, the type of drinking that creates the greatest risk of FASD’s is binge drinking (drinking more than 5 drinks at one time), or drinking seven or more drinks in one week. Drinking less than this amount has also been known to lead to FASD. This is why we we regard any amount of alcohol consumption during pregnancy as being unsafe.

Need help with an addiction?

If you are pregnant and are also addicted to alcohol, you can get help from the following organizations:

  • National Clearinghouse for Alcohol & Drug Information (800-729-6686)
  • National Alcohol & Drug HopeLine 1-800-NCA-CALL (622-2255)

If you would like to learn more about Fetal Alcohol Syndrome you can call the National Organization on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome at 1-800-66-NOFAS (666-6327)

Last Updated: 01/2014

Compiled using information from the following sources:

March of Dimes, http://www.marchofdimes.com/

Department of Health & Human Services, http://www.hhs.gov/