Guinness VIP 5% alcohol. #MadeOfBlack

Ginn Vip made of balck

So is up for two awards at tonight’s All Africa Music Awards. Good luck, Baddo Sneh!

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Alcohol is a terrible messer when it comes to food

Alcohol is notorious for leading people to overeat because of its physiological effect on appetite and because it is generally consumed in a social setting where food is plentiful.

There’s no place to store alcohol in our bodies the way we do food; therefore the body must use incoming alcohol preferentially as its energy source  in order to keep it from reaching toxic levels. This gives alcohol its natural ability to stimulate appetite by depleting the glycogen (carbohydrate) stores in order to metabolize it, causing you to crave carbohydrates.

Alcohol also acts as a diuretic, increasing urination thus decreasing electrolytes like sodium. Again we now begin to crave the things we are losing – hence our desire for salty carbohydrate – like foods ( e.g. chips, crisps, dips, crackers , etc.,).

When you combine alcohol’s natural effects on appetite with its well-known un-inhibiting effects at a destination full of palatable foods, you  have hungry people who often end up with no cares about what and how much food they consume.

 

Source; Neal Spruce, Sharecare.com

The secret of good health? Here’s what the doctors say..No3

The Irish Times asked three influential doctors for their view;

Dr Karena Hanley, GP in Rathmullan Co Donegal, chair of the Postgraduate Training Committee in the Irish College of General Practitioners.

1. Don’t just exercise, stretch: While Irish people have improved vastly in the amount of exercise they take, such as walking, running or cycling, stretching has been somewhat forgotten. The scourges of osteoarthritis and degenerative conditions of the hips, neck and spine can be much reduced by good posture and regular stretching. Pliates, Tai-Chi, yoga, swimming or any set of exercises you remember from sports training days that move most of the joints through their range of movement are good. If you have an illness, injury or already suffer arthritis, your physiotherapist will give appropriate advice.

2. Make fresh fruit and vegetables the centre of your diet: Less fat, less sugar, more fibre, less salt, low cholesterol, less meat, less carbohydrate….. you’ve heard it all and it can get so confusing. Yet you shouldn’t have a diet that spurns fruit and vegetables. Keep it simple, and ensure your shopping trolley contains more fruit and vegetables than any other edible.

3. Focus more on a good lifestyle than on health checks: The BMJ editorial in their recent July 9th edition is entitled “General health checks don’t work”. There are some national screening programmes which are based on good evidence, such as cervical screening, bowel check and breast screening, and I don’t at all dissuade people from using proven health checks. But this editorial actually stated, based on evidence from a Cochrane review in 2012 and the Inter99 trial, that “doctors should not offer general health checks to their patients, and governments should abstain from introducing health check programmes”.

4. The benefits of stopping smoking may be greater than you realised: Once you have stopped smoking for two years, your cardiovascular risk is the same as someone who has never smoked. If you can stop smoking before your 40th birthday, it is unlikely that smoking will cause your death. While we understand how difficult it is to stop, a few practical tips help. My favourite is the three Ds to cope with the three minutes of acute withdrawal (which is as long as it lasts)- take Deep breaths, Distract yourself, or Drink a glass of water.

5. Exercise is the key to maintaining all systems: For good mental health, get out under the big sky! To quote Dr Nick Cavill, a health promotion consultant, “if exercise were a pill, it would be one of the most cost-effective drugs ever invented “.

http://www.irishtimes.com/news/health/the-secret-of-good-health-here-s-what-the-doctors-say-1.1974370?page=3

Tiger beer is 5% alcohol

Tiger beer

This is an advert. For a beer.

Tiger beer is 5 % alcohol/ethanol

Heavier alcohol than better known beers

Alcohol/ethanol is a toxic, addictive drug and a known teratogen for women

This information is of vital consumer health interest

You won’t find any mention of alcohol/ethanol on the advert above

Or on any advert for alcohol/ethanol

The French Paradox, vitamin K2 the key

The French Paradox, the claim the French lived longer than Americans because they drink more red wine was put forward by Dr Serge Renaud in the 1990’s. He said red wine had nutrients like resveratrol which helped reduce heart disease. Even though the French had  more dairy products like cheese, in their diet

This claim has since been debunked because you would have to drink so much red wine to get enough of these nutrients, to increase the risk  of other diseases like cirrhosis. The research did highlight the presence of vitamin K2 in the French diet.  Vitamin K2 is a known factor in reduced levels of heart disease. The vitamin is to be found in green leafy vegetables, fruits, grains and dairy products.

The French diet is rich in vitamin K2

In her 2012 book, Vitamin K2 and the Calcium Paradox, Canadian nutritionist Kate Rhéume-Bleue proposes that the explanation for the lower rate of cardiovascular disease in France is the high level of vitamin K2 (also known as menaquinone) in some of the fattier foods that form a part of the French diet. Lack of vitamin K2 in the diet is linked to increased calcification of plaques in artery walls.

Rhéume-Bleue writes,

The French Paradox isn’t a paradox at all. The very same pâté de foie gras, egg yolks and creamy, buttery sauces that we inaccurately labeled “heart attack on a plate“ literally supply the single most important nutrient to protect heart health.[23]

As one example, Rhéume-Bleue points to the fact that a 3 ½-ounce serving of goose liver pate contains 369 micrograms of menaquinone, while a 3 ½-ounce serving of pan-fried calf liver of the kind frequently eaten in North America contains only 6 micrograms of menaquinone.[24]

The French diet is rich in short-chain saturated fatty acids and poor in trans fats

In his 2009 book Cholesterol and The French Paradox, Frank Cooper argues that the French paradox is due to the lack of hydrogenated and trans fats in the French diet.[25] The French diet is based on natural saturated fats such as butter, cheese and cream that the human body finds easy to metabolize, because they are rich in shorter saturated fatty acids ranging from the 4-carbon butyric acid to the 16-carbon palmitic acid. But the American diet includes greater amounts saturated fats made via hydrogenating vegetable oils which include longer 18- and 20-carbon fatty acids. In addition, these hydrogenated fats include small quantities of trans fats which may have associated health risks.[26][27][28]

The Long-Field

 

strawberries

“We have all grown up with the Long-Field. City folk see it as green ditches with no footpaths as soon as they have escaped the urban. Cattle and sheep view it as manna from heaven when they escape out on to it from their closures and rural folk, well rural folk are always delighted to inform their fellow farmers that it is their stock that has escaped onto the Long – Field and not their own”

Evan Doyle of “Strawberry Tree” fame talks about his passion for Wild Food, a feature of his restaurant.

Evan goes on to describe the Long – Field;

“The Long – Field is the 327,258 km of Irish grass verges and hedge rows. Our lush damp climate produces a stunning array of wild foods, from fresh spring herbs to summer berries to autumn mushrooms and nuts”

His chefs can be seen out foraging for nettles for the” Wild Nettle Tea”and Dillisk for oatcakes. Or wading for seaweed for “Wild Carrigeen and Wild Prawn Bisque”.   They pick wild garlic for the “Wild garlic, leek and potato bake” and mushrooms for the “Wild St. Georges mushroom, spinach and gorgonzola risotto”. They are gathering Wild Sea Beet, Wild Rock Samphire, Wild Sorrell and others, all to put into delicious dishes. The book is full of recipes.

“Wild Food” is an eye opener to the harvest nature provides. “Wild Food” by Biddy White Lennon and Evan Doyle is published by O’Brien Press. The Strawberry Tree, Macreddin Village, Aughrim, Co. Wicklow.

 

Your brain is your best friend

Your brain is your best friend, it controls everything you do, how you feel.

This is how it can make you happy, just by taking a little exercise;

“What triggers happiness in our brain when we exercise?

If you start exercising, your brain recognises this as a moment of stress. As your heart pressure increases, the brain thinks you are either fighting the enemy or fleeing from it. To protect yourself and your brain from stress, you release a protein called BDNF (Brain – Derived Neurothropic Factor). This BDNF has a protective and also a reparative element to your memory neurons and acts as a reset switch. That’s why we often feel so at ease and things are clear after exercising and we have a happy sense of achievement”       Leo Widrich, blog.bufferapp.com

A half hour walk will do. While your brain accounts for only 2% of your body weight, it devours 20% of the energy. There’s a lot going on in there so it pays to look after your best friend. Here’s a list of top foods for the brain;

  1. Wholegrains
  2. Oily fish
  3. Blueberries, strawberries, raspberries, blackcurrants
  4. Tomatoes, avocados
  5. Water
  6. Dark chocolate
  7. Pumpkin seeds
  8. Broccoli
  9. Nuts

If you look after your brain  – your brain will look after you

Sound health!

10 simple ways to lose weight

1.Eat a healthy breakfast! It kicks start your metabolism and you are less likely to snack mid morning and less likely to eat past the point of fullness at lunch. Eating porridge every morning has other health benefits. It boosts energy, helps to lower cholesterol( as part of a low-fat diet), and may help prevent heart disease and other cancers, helps control blood sugars and aids digestion.

2.Eat cereal for breakfast (hot or cold). Breakfast cereals such as whole grain cereals (oat or wheat based cereals) are lower in calories and higher in vitamins and minerals than other breakfast foods. A typical breakfast demi- baguette contains 1,335 calories and 66g of fat – EIGHT times the calories and 33 times the fat value of a breakfast of porridge oats and a serving of orange juice.

3. Choose porridge and a glass of freshly squeezed orange juice Instead of a latte and a croissant and save 140 kcal and 14g fat. Or if you insist on having morning coffee, swap your cappuccino or latte for an Americano and save 100 kcal. As porridge is 100% whole grain, one bowl provides two of the three servings of whole grains recommended for health. Diets rich in whole grain can help prevent heart disease.

4. Drink plenty of water; people often mistake thirst for hunger. The recommended daily amount is two litres and more when exercising.

5. Choose an apple instead of a muffin and save 265 kcal and 14g fat. Or go for a pear instead of a ring doughnut and be 200 kcal better off.

6. Eat more low energy dense foods like fruit and vegetables – leave the fruit bowl on the kitchen table and finish every meal with a piece of fruit.

7. Half fill your plate with steamed or salad vegetables at your main meal. These foods are filling but have very few calories.

8. Avoid distractions at mealtimes. Eating while reading the newspaper or watching the television can blunt satiety cues and results in higher calorie intakes.

9. Don’t snack while watching the television (or at the cinema) as this leads to passive over consumption of calories. Look but don’t eat.

10. Watch the size of your portions! Food portion sizes grow year by year, even though people actually need less energy due to a shift towards sedentary lifestyles. The Americans have dubbed it ” portion distortion”

Source; Nuala Collins, Leading independent nutritionist, www. flahavans.ie/health-and-nutrition