Morgans spiced up heavy alcohol

Morgan order

Warm, smooth, comforting. The consumer could be  fooled

Don’t be

This is an advert for a bottle of heavy alcohol/ethanol

The ABV reference on the label is deliberately excluded from the advert

Captain Morgans spiced up rum is 37.5% alcohol/ethanol

This information is witheld from the consumer

Alcohol/ethanol is a toxic, addictive, psychoactive drug

Heavy alcohol is a great danger to your health

Be aware of this. Steer clear


Less Guinness. Not More

Less Guinness

The core ingredient of Guinness is alcohol/ethanol

A toxic, addictive, carcinogenic drug

For the sake of your health you should


Sweeten the Jameson pill

Jame G & L1Jame G&L

  • Jameson 40% alcohol/ethanol is unpalatable,  Jameson advise adding sweeteners  to make it palatable
  • The target consumer, young inexperienced drinkers, to get them hooked up early
  • This mixture calls for ginger ale and slices of lime
  • The bottle on display has been deliberately blurred and sanitized to ensure any reference to alcohol is obliterated
  • Sine Metu – Without Fear. The Jameson family motto, is featured prominently, why is that?
  • The bottle of Jameson whiskey is displayed, to encourage the target consumer to buy by the bottle
  • The mandatory “enjoy Jameson sensibly” tagline is barely visible in the top corner
  • What does this mean? Can a person enjoy 40% alcohol/ethanol sensibly?
  • Will this tell the consumer how much a person can drink before they become insensible?
  • Alcohol/ethanol is a toxic, addictive, psychoactive drug, a threat to every part of the body. The consumer has the right to be informed about all aspects of alcohol/ethanol in the advertisement

The French Paradox, vitamin K2 the key

The French Paradox, the claim the French lived longer than Americans because they drink more red wine was put forward by Dr Serge Renaud in the 1990’s. He said red wine had nutrients like resveratrol which helped reduce heart disease. Even though the French had  more dairy products like cheese, in their diet

This claim has since been debunked because you would have to drink so much red wine to get enough of these nutrients, to increase the risk  of other diseases like cirrhosis. The research did highlight the presence of vitamin K2 in the French diet.  Vitamin K2 is a known factor in reduced levels of heart disease. The vitamin is to be found in green leafy vegetables, fruits, grains and dairy products.

The French diet is rich in vitamin K2

In her 2012 book, Vitamin K2 and the Calcium Paradox, Canadian nutritionist Kate Rhéume-Bleue proposes that the explanation for the lower rate of cardiovascular disease in France is the high level of vitamin K2 (also known as menaquinone) in some of the fattier foods that form a part of the French diet. Lack of vitamin K2 in the diet is linked to increased calcification of plaques in artery walls.

Rhéume-Bleue writes,

The French Paradox isn’t a paradox at all. The very same pâté de foie gras, egg yolks and creamy, buttery sauces that we inaccurately labeled “heart attack on a plate“ literally supply the single most important nutrient to protect heart health.[23]

As one example, Rhéume-Bleue points to the fact that a 3 ½-ounce serving of goose liver pate contains 369 micrograms of menaquinone, while a 3 ½-ounce serving of pan-fried calf liver of the kind frequently eaten in North America contains only 6 micrograms of menaquinone.[24]

The French diet is rich in short-chain saturated fatty acids and poor in trans fats

In his 2009 book Cholesterol and The French Paradox, Frank Cooper argues that the French paradox is due to the lack of hydrogenated and trans fats in the French diet.[25] The French diet is based on natural saturated fats such as butter, cheese and cream that the human body finds easy to metabolize, because they are rich in shorter saturated fatty acids ranging from the 4-carbon butyric acid to the 16-carbon palmitic acid. But the American diet includes greater amounts saturated fats made via hydrogenating vegetable oils which include longer 18- and 20-carbon fatty acids. In addition, these hydrogenated fats include small quantities of trans fats which may have associated health risks.[26][27][28]

Drink is such a waste

Alcohol is a powerful, addictive drug with the capacity to transform a personality in an instant. The saying “First a person takes a drink, then the drink takes a drink, then the drink takes the person” is so true

Drink is a waste of health.  Alcohol/ethanol and its associate acetaldehyde is very damaging to all vital elements of the body and mind

Drink is a waste of time.  Drinking over time ends up with the person in a state of dependence, spending more and more time drinking and intoxicated. The mind and body are depressed for long periods

Drink is a waste of money.  Hundreds of euros or pounds in a week, thousands in a year, hundreds of thousands over many years

Drink is  a waste of life.  Alcohol is a toxic drug that kills cells, the very building blocks of life

The Effects of alcohol on the Body

Even a small amount of alcohol has an effect on your body. When you drink, alcohol is absorbed into your bloodstream and distributed throughout your body. A tiny amount of alcohol exits your body in your urine and your breath.

You absorb alcohol more slowly if you eat, especially if the food is high in fat. However, if you drink more than your body can process, you’ll get drunk. How quickly alcohol is metabolized depends on your size and gender, among other things.

Alcohol consumption causes physical and emotional changes that can do great harm to your body. The long-term effects of alcohol abuse are many, putting your health in serious jeopardy and endangering your life.

The liver takes the brunt
Alcohol must pass through the liver. Chronic alcohol abuse overwhelms the liver so it can’t break down harmful substances
Slurred speech
Slurred speech is one of the first signs you’ve had too much
Shrinking frontal lobe
Impaired judgement may be the result of a shrinking brain
Strange sensations
Numbness  and pain in your hands and feet may be the result of damage to your nervous system
When chronic drinkers suddenly stop drinking, severe withdrawal symptoms, including hallucinations may occur
Major mouth problems
 A loose tooth, together with other signs of alcohol addiction, could be a sign your drinking is out of control
Alcohol interferes with your body’s ability to use the nutrients and vitamins in the food you eat
Hard on the heart
Heavy drinking can mess with your heart rhythm or even damage your heart muscle
Sexual dysfunction
Drinking is no aphrodisiac, in fact it can make you sexually dysfunctional
Birth defects 
Drinking during pregnancy can cause a lifetime of problems for your newborn
Muscle cramps
A muscle cramp can be a signal you’re drinking too much
Check out that cough
People who drink a lot are more susceptible to lung infections like tuberculosis
Pain in the pancreas
Pancreatitis is a life threatening condition. One of the causes of chronic pancreatitis is alcoholism
Diabetic danger zone
If you have diabetes, excessive alcohol consumption can lead to many complications
That uncoordinated attempt to walk a straight line might mean you’ve had more to drink than your body can process
Can’t remember what you did last night? Or are parts of the night missing from your memory. It may be a sign you drank too much
Shifty eyes
Long-term alcohol abuse can cause involuntary eye movements
If you become physically dependent, a doctor’s care may make withdrawal safer
Stomach distress
Bloating, gas or painful stomach ulcers could be the result of too much alcohol
Gotta go
 A damaged digestive tract may not work efficiently, leading to bouts of diarrhoea
Fighting fatigue
Fatigue could be a sign of anemia, a possible sign of alcoholism
in the long-term, excessive alcohol can make it difficult to conceive
Skinny skeleton
Thinning bones may lead to easy fractures

The Long-Field



“We have all grown up with the Long-Field. City folk see it as green ditches with no footpaths as soon as they have escaped the urban. Cattle and sheep view it as manna from heaven when they escape out on to it from their closures and rural folk, well rural folk are always delighted to inform their fellow farmers that it is their stock that has escaped onto the Long – Field and not their own”

Evan Doyle of “Strawberry Tree” fame talks about his passion for Wild Food, a feature of his restaurant.

Evan goes on to describe the Long – Field;

“The Long – Field is the 327,258 km of Irish grass verges and hedge rows. Our lush damp climate produces a stunning array of wild foods, from fresh spring herbs to summer berries to autumn mushrooms and nuts”

His chefs can be seen out foraging for nettles for the” Wild Nettle Tea”and Dillisk for oatcakes. Or wading for seaweed for “Wild Carrigeen and Wild Prawn Bisque”.   They pick wild garlic for the “Wild garlic, leek and potato bake” and mushrooms for the “Wild St. Georges mushroom, spinach and gorgonzola risotto”. They are gathering Wild Sea Beet, Wild Rock Samphire, Wild Sorrell and others, all to put into delicious dishes. The book is full of recipes.

“Wild Food” is an eye opener to the harvest nature provides. “Wild Food” by Biddy White Lennon and Evan Doyle is published by O’Brien Press. The Strawberry Tree, Macreddin Village, Aughrim, Co. Wicklow.


Is red wine good for your heart?

No, is the simple answer

The French paradox – in spite of high saturated fat intake, the French die less of coronary heart disease thanks to their higher consumption of red wine

The concept that drinking red wine can prevent cardiovascular disease dates back to the early nineties, when Serge Renaud and Michel de Lorgeril published a paper in the Lancet entitled,   ” Wine, alcohol, platelets and the French paradox for coronary heart disease”. They argued that whereas their consumption of saturated fat was high, mortality from coronary heart disease was low compared to the US and the UK. They called this the “French paradox” The difference was the French drink more red wine, there was some protective polyphenols that came straight from red grapes. The studies were based on data from three French cities, Toulouse, Strasbourg and Lille. CHD mortality was much lower in Toulouse compared to Strasbourg and Lille, however wine consumption was much higher in Toulouse compared to the other two cities.

In the 1990s, wine  sales in europe were declining, with many young people switching to beer, wine drinking was seen to be old-fashioned. The wine industry jumped on the “French paradox” story promoting an epic marketing campaign which instilled in a lot of people the idea that drinking red wine is good for your heart.

A great deal of research ensued and found, while there was some beneficial effects from the extracts from grapes, the amount of wine needed to get enough resveratrols to produce a significant effect would be incompatible with the toxic effects of alcohol.

The key to below the norm mortality rates from CHD in Toulouse, was not red wine but diet. While they drank more red wine and ate slightly more cheese, they ate a lot more vegetables, a lot more fruit, half the butter and more vegetable fat and more bread. In other words they were eating more fruit and vegetables and ingested more fibre, less saturated fat, more polyunsaturated fat and more grains.

The popular narrative of the French paradox gets the premise and the conclusion wrong. It is wrong to assume that saturated fat is all that matters to predict cardiovascular risk, since we know it is just one of the many dietary factors involved. And it is dead wrong to suggest that drinking a few glasses of red wine is all you need to make it better. If anything, the whole story proves once more the concept that the balance of diet in general is more important than any single component in preventing disease and ensuring good health. 01/18/2013; Stefano Vendrame

Our brain is inconceivable, beyond imagination


The brain is made up of an inconceivable number of cells

An “enchanted loom” is how Charles Sherrington described the interconnected net of cells that make up our three-pound control centre. Indeed there is something almost magical in the notion that all our mental processes from perception, to memory to consciousness itself, can be described entirely by cellular activity in the brain.

The basic functional unit of the brain is the neuron, a special cell that sends electrochemical signals to other neurons (across a “synaptic gap”) and thereby creates those patterns that make up what we think of as the mind.

The complexity of the task requires a fairly inconceivable 100 billion neurons, interconnected via trillions of synapses. A single firing neutron might communicate to thousands of others in a single moment. No computer comes close to the complexity of these communicating bits of organic matter.

What’s more, for each neuron there are 10 to 15 glial cells providing structural support, protection, resources and more.


Alcohol is a drug that goes to the brain, interfering with the cells, disrupting the communication. That is why after a few drinks we have difficulty thinking, talking, walking, eating. The more alcohol, the more out of control.

Why do we consciously interfere with the workings of this incredible machine?

If we knew how much damage we were doing to our brain, would we drink as much?

Would we drink at all?

Keith Floyd on pleasure

I drink whisky, I drink beer, I drink wine. I love fatty pork and beef on the bone. I eat chocolate, fish and chips and caviar and drink vodka. I drink instant coffee but adore a Spanish cafe solo. I eat chillies, ginger and garlic. I adore pungent blue cheeses like Roquefort and Gorgonzola and Danish Blue. I love liver with fried onions and I enjoy ice cream and hot chocolate sauce between cigarettes. I drink Champagne on occasion, aquavit rarely, gin and tonic occasionally. I love apples and Mars bars. In fact I am a chocaholic. Actually I am a kind of gastronomic tramp. I am too hungry for dinner at eight, and sometimes at breakfast a curry is great. Ossobuco in an Italian service station can please, an ignorantly served hamburger can bring you to your knees. For me the whole thing about eating and drinking is whatever gives you pleasure, enjoyment and fun

Sadly Keith Floyd died of a heart attack at 66. From the book Floyd Uncorked by Jonathan Pedley with Keith Floyd