Do you know how alcohol affects your skin? 10 Q&A’s

1. Why does your skin appear dull after drinking?

Alcohol dehydrates your skin and depletes it of vital skin nutrients

2. If you overindulge in alcohol, what long-term effect on facial blood vessels occur?

Drinking alcohol causes facial blood vessels to dilate. Excessive alcohol can cause the vessels to dilate permanently. This causes red spiky veins.

3. Does alcohol consumption affect other skin conditions such as rosacea and psoriasis?

Alcohol may aggravate these skin conditions and cause additional flare ups

4. Which foods should you avoid when suffering a hangover?

Anything fried. Choose nutrient rich foods to reverse some of the negative effects of the drinking from the night before, whole grain toast for example

5. Alcohol depletes which beneficial vitamin?

Vitamin A, an important anti-oxidant

6. Why is vitamin A beneficial to the skin?

Vitamin A is an anti-oxidant that boosts collagen production and skin cell turnover

7. What is the primary physical trait of heavy drinkers?

Heavy drinkers usually have rosy cheeks, a red nose or a flushed face

8. What should you drink along with alcohol to avoid dehydration?

Drinking water along with alcohol will counteract the effects of the alcohol and will decrease dehydration

9. The toxins in alcohol can contribute to what unattractive skin flaw?

Alcohol can cause the build up of cellulite

10. After several drinks, the body will divert oxygen and blood away from where?

The skin. Skin loses important blood circulation because oxygen and blood is diverted to the liver and other organs

Source: Howstuffworks.com

 

Alcohol and calories (in women); does drinking cause weight gain?

“When you drink alcohol, its broken down into acetaldehyde (basically vinegar) , which the body will burn before any other calorie you’ve consumed or stored including fat or even sugar. So if you drink and consume more calories than you need , you’re more likely to store the fat from the Cheez Whiz you ate and the sugar from the  Coke you drank because your body is getting all its energy from the acetaldehyde in the beer you sucked down.

Further, studies show that alcohol temporarily inhibits “lipid oxidisation” – in other words, when alcohol is in your system, it’s harder for your body to burn fat that’s already there. Since eating fat is the most metabolically efficient way to put fat on your body – you actually use a small amount of calories when you turn excess carbs and protein into body fat, but excess fat slips right into your saddlebags, no costume change necessary – hypothetically speaking, following a high fat – high alcohol diet would be the easiest way to put on weight”

Rachael Coombe, Elle.com

Alcohol and drug addiction – Deficiency in the brain

Research has found that there are electro-physiological deficits in the brains of alcoholics

Not just in alcoholics but in their progeny, suggesting that electro-physiological deficits exist even before alcohol consumption in the children of people who drink alcohol

Drug taking changes the brains magnetic and electrical systems impacting on the body’s nervous system to produce a high

With long-term use they act to devitalise the body, having a seriously damaging effect on the vital life force, further reinforcing the need to take the drug

Low magnetic levels in the brain and body are caused by deficiencies of folic acid, zinc, thiamine and other nutrients

The western based meat diet is largely responsible. It is nutritionally inadequate in terms of antidioxant vitamins and minerals, and deficient in negative magnetism

Over time, the animal product diet can create abnormal cravings for drugs which will differ in strength depending on nutrient availability and level of magnetic balance

On such a diet the natural opioids no longer function as they should, causing craving and eventually drug use and addiction. Drugs supply exhilaration as they stimulate the reward or pleasure centre of the brain. They act to increase the electrical firing in the reward centre releasing certain neurotransmitters which induce a sense of euphoria, elevation in mood, increased arousal and motivation

Excited by the drug taking behaviour, the brain’s neural circuitry adapts to the chemical state. If the drug is withdrawn, brain function is impaired and pleasure is replaced by pain, inducing depression and a loss of energy and motivation. Continued drug use is reinforced, first by the physical addiction and secondly,  by the strong psychological desire to avoid painful withdrawal

Drug taking behaviour and abuse is a form of appetitive behaviour as drugs stimulate the same area of the brain that rules feeding and drinking i.e., the reward and pleasure centre. A poor nutritional and vital state will create the need to consume or use drugs. The link between nutrition, appetite and drugs is further enforced by the fact that drugs replace the need for food as a person becomes more dependent

Alcohol functions primarily to relax as does opium. Other drugs stimulate (e.g., caffeine),  and can trigger the tension that may lead to drinking

Some drinkers drink to reduce social tensions or feelings of inadequacy. Some may drink to attain a positive pleasure rather than to combat a negative stimulus. But all these mental and emotional triggers have neurophsyiological and nutritional abnormality as their precursors

The similarity between behaviours of those people who are addicted to food( anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa) and those who are addicted to drugs  indicates a disorder of the self-regulatory control of the appetite. The drug takers habit may be triggered by emotional factors as in the obese, bulimic or anorexic persons’ eating patterns, but these are secondary stimuli.

The primary cause is poor diet and the brain’s consequent magnetic and chemical imbalance

Source; Awaremed.com

 

Alcohol and your liver

Alcohol is toxic to your liver, and if you drink heavily over a long period of time you can experience cirrhosis of the liver and death. Heavy drinkers over the long-term can also impair their liver’s ability to actuate vitamins, which contributes to the malnutrition often suffered by long-term alcoholics

Source; Fitday.com